Source of human milk (mother or donor) is more important than fortifier type (human or bovine) in shaping the preterm infant microbiome

Shreyas V. Kumbhare, William Diehl Jones, Sharla Fast, Christine Bonner, Geert ‘t Jong, Gary Van Domselaar, Morag Graham, Michael Narvey, Meghan B. Azad

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Milk fortifiers help meet the nutritional needs of preterm infants receiving their mother's own milk (MOM) or donor human milk. We conducted a randomized clinical trial (NCT03214822) in 30 very low birth weight premature neonates comparing bovine-derived human milk fortifier (BHMF) versus human-derived fortifier (H2MF). We found that fortifier type does not affect the overall microbiome, although H2MF infants were less often colonized by an unclassified member of Clostridiales Family XI. Secondary analyses show that MOM intake is strongly associated with weight gain and microbiota composition, including Bifidobacterium, Veillonella, and Propionibacterium enrichment. Finally, we show that while oxidative stress (urinary F2-isoprostanes) is not affected by fortifier type or MOM intake, fecal calprotectin is higher in H2MF infants and lower in those consuming more MOM. Overall, the source of human milk (mother versus donor) appears more important than the type of milk fortifier (human versus bovine) in shaping preterm infant gut microbiota.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100712
JournalCell Reports Medicine
Volume3
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Sep. 2022

Keywords

  • calprotectin
  • gut inflammation
  • gut microbiome
  • human donor milk
  • human milk fortifiers
  • mother's own milk
  • oxidative stress
  • very low birth weight infants

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