Predictors of physical activity among rural and small town breast cancer survivors: An application of the theory of planned behaviour

Jeff K. Vallance, Celeste Lavallee, Nicole S. Culos-Reed, Marc G. Trudeau

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the utility of the two-component theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in understanding physical activity intentions and behaviour in rural and small town breast cancer survivors. The secondary objective was to elicit the most common behavioural, normative and control beliefs of rural and small town survivors regarding physical activity. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 524 rural and small town breast cancer survivors completed a mailed survey that assessed physical activity and TPB variables. Physical activity intention explained 12% of the variance in physical activity behaviour (p<0.01) while the TPB constructs together explained 43% of the variance in physical activity intention (p<0.01). Unique behavioural, normative and control beliefs were elicited from the sample. The two-component TPB framework appears to be a suitable model to initiate an understanding of physical activity determinants among rural and small town breast cancer survivors. These data can be used in the development and establishment of physical activity behaviour interventions and health promotion materials designed to facilitate physical activity behaviour among rural and small town breast cancer survivors.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)685-697
    Number of pages13
    JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
    Volume17
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec. 2012

    Keywords

    • breast cancer survivors
    • physical activity
    • rural
    • theory of planned behaviour

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