Perinatal Maternal Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms and Child Executive Function and Attention at Two-years of Age

Kharah M. Ross, Nicole Letourneau, Emma Climie, Gerald Giesbrecht, Deborah Dewey

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective was to investigate whether perinatal maternal anxiety and depressive symptoms predicted child attention and executive function (EF). Mothers (N = 614) reported pregnancy and three-months postnatal anxiety and depressive symptoms. Attention and EF were measured at two-years-of-age. Covariates were demographics, alcohol use, mood disorder history, and pregnancy factors. Higher prenatal anxiety, b(SE) =.020(.005), p<.001, and postnatal depressive symptoms, b(SE) =.009(.004), p=.04, predicted poorer child attention. A prenatal-by-postnatal depressive symptom interaction emerged, b(SE) = −.005(.003), p=.04: When pregnancy depressive symptoms were low, higher postnatal symptoms predicted poorer attention. No distress variables predicted EF, p’s>.22. Perinatal distress timing, kind, and change were important for child attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)380-395
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Aug. 2020

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