Exploring the feasibility of a broad-reach physical activity behavior change intervention for women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer: A randomized trial

Jeff K. Vallance, Christine M. Friedenreich, Celeste M. Lavallee, Nicole Culos-Reed, John R. MacKey, Barbara Walley, Kerry S. Courneya

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Facilitating healthy levels of physical activity (PA) during chemotherapy is important for the psychosocial and physical health of breast cancer survivors. The primary objective of this feasibility study was to examine the effects of a broad-reach PA behavior change intervention among women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (N = 95) were randomly assigned to receive a PA resource kit consisting of tailored print materials and a step pedometer (intervention) or a standard public health PA recommendation (standard recommendation). The primary outcome was daily pedometer steps. Secondary outcomes were self-reported light, moderate, and vigorous intensity PA, total moderate-to-vigorous PA, and sedentary time. Assessments were conducted before and after adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Attrition was 19% (17 of 95). Intervention patients wore their step pedometer for 85 days (range, 35-144 days; SD = 26.4) for a 95% adherence rate. Analyses of covariance suggested that the intervention was not statistically superior to standard recommendation for daily average pedometer steps (-771; 95% CI = -2024 to 482; P = 0.22), total MVPA minutes (-4; 95% CI = -62 to 570; P = 0.90), or sedentary time (+160; 95% CI = -186 to 506; P = 0.42). Conclusion: This broach-reach and low intensive intervention was not more effective for promoting PA in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy than providing the standard public health guidelines for PA. Impact: Achieving physical activity behavior change during adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy may require some level of supervised physical activity or more intensive (e.g., face-to-face, supervised) interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-398
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb. 2016

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