Examining lifestyle information sources, needs, and preferences among breast cancer survivors in Northern British Columbia

Lindsay Vander Meer, Jeff K. Vallance, Geoff D.C. Ball, Steven T. Johnson

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose: Little is known about the lifestyle (e.g., physical activity, nutrition) information needs among breast cancer survivors living in nonurban settings. This study determined lifestyle information sources, needs, and preferences among breast cancer survivors in Northern British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods: A cross-sectional, paper-based survey was distributed to a random sample of breast cancer survivors (n = 300) in Northern BC, which was generated through the BC Cancer Registry. Results: A total of 132 breast cancer survivors responded (true response rate = 49%; 132/270 received surveys). Two-thirds lived in rural and remote locations. The most commonly reported need was diet and physical activity (58%) to decrease risk of recurrence or improve survival. The most frequently identified sources of lifestyle information included physicians, family or friends, the internet, and magazines. A majority of breast cancer survivors (64%) preferred face-to-face interactions when considering potential lifestyle-related programs or services; distance-based formats (e.g., videoconferencing) were least preferred (11%). Conclusions: There is strong interest in information about lifestyle behaviours among breast cancer survivors in nonurban settings such as Northern BC. Future research is needed to investigate how best to deliver evidence-based lifestyle-related information to breast cancer survivors residing in nonurban settings.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)212-216
    Number of pages5
    JournalCanadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
    Volume78
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec. 2017

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