Enhancing police engagement: An examination of the links between fair treatment and job engagement in a Canadian police organization

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationships between organizational justice and job engagement, and whether these relationships were stronger for civilian staff vs police officers. Using survey data from a Canadian police organization, the results suggested that when police personnel perceived they were treated fairly, they were more likely to have a sense of psychological safety, which, in turn, enhanced their identification with their organization and increased their engagement with work. Findings further demonstrated that distributive justice (i.e., equitable outcomes) was more important to police officers than civilian staff, particularly, in relation to enhancing their attachment with the organization. In other words, as perceptions of distributive justice increased so did organizational identification; however, this effect was strongest for police officers. In general, organizational justice has positive implications for police organizations, namely in encouraging police personnel to engage their full selves at work.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)308-322
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Police Science and Management
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep. 2020

Keywords

  • Job engagement
  • organizational identification
  • organizational justice
  • psychological safety

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