Acute and sub-chronic effects of sub-lethal cadmium exposure on energy metabolism in the freshwater shrimp, Paratya curvirostris

Rathishri Chandurvelan, Islay D. Marsden, Sally Gaw, Chris N. Glover

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic trace element enriched in waters through activities such as mining and agriculture. The freshwater shrimp Paratya curvirostris inhabits near-coastal, lowland streams potentially impacted by Cd, but nothing is known regarding its sensitivity to this metal. An acute (96 h) median lethal concentration (LC50) of 405 µg L−1 was derived for P. curvirostris, placing it among the most tolerant of freshwater shrimp species. Acute (4 d; 0, 50 and 100 µg L−1) and sub-chronic (10 d; 0, 25 and 50 µg L−1) exposures then investigated effects of Cd on energy metabolism (respiration rate, excretion rate, O:N ratio). In contrast to effects in previously studied species, Cd induced an increased respiration rate, which when coupled with an unchanged excretion rate, resulted in an increased O:N ratio. These data were explained by an increased reliance on carbohydrate and/or lipid as a metabolic substrate stimulated by increased metabolic costs of toxicant exposure. Similar effects were seen across all time-points, although the lowest effective Cd concentration decreased with increased exposure time. Overall, results suggest that Cd is unlikely to be a significant environmental stressor to P. curvirostris, except in highly contaminated freshwaters, and/or where Cd co-occurs with hypoxia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-67
Number of pages8
JournalEcotoxicology and Environmental Safety
Volume135
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan. 2017

Keywords

  • Bioenergetics
  • Cadmium
  • Crustacean
  • Nitrogen excretion
  • Oxygen consumption
  • Toxicity

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